The popularity of rosé

Over the past 10 years the sales of rosé has gradually increased. Not only have we seen this in the store but it appears to be a global trend and we’ve found some research on this. The CIVP (Interprofessional Council of Wines of Provence), states that,rosé wine consumption has increased every year since 1990, setting a new record in 2013 when it represented 30% of total wine consumption.” What we found interesting is that there has been an increase in women drinking rosé (an increase of 8% between 2008 and 2012) and in younger people; 18-24 years old) from 28% in 2008 and 32% in 2012. We were astounded to learn that worldwide there are 36 million rosé wine consumers according to the CIVP Wine Intelligence survey. That’s some serious rosé drinking!

We found some interesting graphics and info from the CIVP highlighting those countries that drink the most rosé as well as global rosé production, check it out below.

Global rosé production graphic
Global rosé production graphic

One type of rosé that has become popular is Provençal rosé. Of course it isn’t just made in Provence, in the south, (although they are the largest rosé producing region in France) but it’s also made in other areas of the country, in the Loire, Rhône, Languedoc Roussillon, Bordeaux, Corsica and the South west. And it can be found in most wine making countries from Chile to the US, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, Portugal and Spain.

The most common way rosé is made is similar to some white wine production.  Once picked, the grapes, stems and stalks are separated and the grapes are crushed, releasing the juice. The skin, juice and seeds all then macerate together in a temperature controlled vat for up to 20 hours. During this time, the colour from the skin bleeds into the juice. You don’t want a long maceration as this will allow more colour but also tannins and other flavours into the wine. The skin and seeds are then separated from the juice which then ferments. Then depending on the style the winemaker wants, there’s either no malolactic fermentation or malolactic fermentation. The wine is clarified, aged on less or without (depending on the style), then bottled and sold to you. This is a quick summary/overview of wine making and there is a lot more to it than this (winemaking and viticulture technique, style, grape varieties). But this helps explain how the pink colour ends up in your glass of rosé!

Countries that drink the most rosé
Countries that drink the most rosé

We love rosé here at Swanny Cellars with wines from Spain, New Zealand, Australia, France, Greece and Portugal.

And this month, the Liquor Barons wine of the month comes from Provence, Famille Negrel who have been making wine since the start of the 1800s. Drop in and grab a bottle, down to $16.99 until the end of January.

Wine of the month Famille Negrel
Wine of the month Famille Negrel